How To Make Rose Water Using Fresh Flowers

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How To Make Rose Water using Fresh Flowers is much simpler than you may think!  All you need are the flowers and distilled water.  Add a splash of vodka to help preserve the water if you would like.

How to make rose water (for recipes) using fresh flowers! #diy #recipe #rosewater | www.thefoodieaffair.com

Isn’t this bright ruby red rose water beautiful?  If I didn’t make this myself I would think that the rose water got a little brighter with food coloring.

Nope.  No enhancements.  The color is a natural beauty straight from the petals of the flowers!

Last week I was feeling a little creative and thought I dive outside of my cooking comfort zone and try making a couple of recipes that are popular in the Middle East.

I had my eyes on a cake that would be lovely for Valentine’s Day, but as I was gathering my ingredients I came to a road block.  I couldn’t find rose water!

How to make rose water (for recipes) using fresh flowers! #diy #recipe #rosewater | www.thefoodieaffair.com

I was on a serious hunt and went to every Latin as well as Asian and Mediterranean specialty stores without any luck.  I had super high hopes that World Market would carry it, but I struck out there too.

That’s when I thought, “ok, I must learn how to make rose water myself!

I learned from WikiHow that there are several ways to make rose water.  One method requires the crushing of the petals, and another you use dried flowers.  I opted for a simple 30 minute method using fresh flower petals and I’m so happy with the results!

How to make rose water (for recipes) using fresh flowers! #diy #recipe #rosewater | www.thefoodieaffair.com

Adding rose water to recipes only requires a teaspoon or two.  Rose water acts similar to extracts.  In this case the rose water adds a hint of floral flavor.

To make rose water you need just two cups of distilled water, and clean rose petals from about two roses. I added a teaspoon of vodka, which will act as a preservative.

Simmer all the ingredients until the color of the rose petals are pale, which only takes between 20-30 minutes.  That’s how to make rose water!  I’ll never have to hunt for it again!

I can’t wait to get in the kitchen and try some new recipes.  In the meantime, add some rose water to whipped cream, yogurt, sparkling wine or fresh cut up fruit!

But don’t limit using rose water in just recipes.  How about making a face toner, body lotion or check out this list of 10 rose water benefits!  The fun has just begun!

How to make rose water (for recipes) using fresh flowers! #diy #recipe #rosewater | www.thefoodieaffair.com

5.0 from 1 reviews
How To Make Rose Water Using Fresh Flowers
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: DIY
Serves: 1¾ cups
Ingredients
  • 2 cups distilled water
  • 1 cup (about 2 roses) petals cleaned
  • 1 teaspoon vodka (optional)
Instructions
  1. In a small saucepan add distilled water, vodka and rose petals. Cover and bring to a simmer. Simmer until petals are pale (25-30 minutes).
  2. Remove from heat and drain liquid though a cheesecloth into a clean container. Discard petals.
Notes
Use fresh roses that are free of pesticides and fragrant for best results. Keep refrigerated and use within one week. If you are adding the vodka this will last longer , but I haven't test how much longer.

How to make rose water (for recipes) using fresh flowers! #diy #recipe #rosewater | www.thefoodieaffair.com

Sandra @ The Foodie Affair
 

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33 Comments on How To Make Rose Water Using Fresh Flowers

  1. avatar
    Jolina says:
    February 13, 2017

    This is so interesting! I’ve never thought of this as an ingredient, is it more for sweet or savoury dishes? It is perfect for Valentine though 🙂

    • avatar
      February 13, 2017

      You can use it for both sweet and savory. It’s so unique and common for Indian and Middle Eastern foods.

    • avatar
      February 16, 2017

      Have you made it before? This is the first time for me.

  2. avatar
    christine says:
    February 13, 2017

    I’ve never even heard of rose water. Well, maybe I have heard of it but never really for any recipe. You are a brave one to figure it out yourself. Great job!

    • avatar
      February 16, 2017

      Brave or stubborn! lol When I want something. I really, really want it and must find a way 😉

  3. avatar
    Melanie says:
    February 13, 2017

    I’ve never really known what to do with rose water!

    • avatar
      February 16, 2017

      Oh stay tuned. I share some fun ways to use it up!

  4. avatar
    Emily says:
    February 14, 2017

    I am surprised by all of the ways to use rose water. I like the idea of using it for a lotion. It seems really easy to make!

    • avatar
      February 16, 2017

      I agree and so nice to know that you aren’t adding any chemicals to or in your body!

  5. avatar
    February 14, 2017

    I’ve always wanted to make some homemade personal care items. Rose water seems to be a great starting point!

    • avatar
      February 16, 2017

      I just mixed some with some lavender oil for a room spray. It smells wonderful!

  6. avatar
    February 14, 2017

    I have seen many recipes which call for rosewater and avoid them as I can’t be bothered to make or buy it so thank you for your lovely recipe!!!

    • avatar
      February 16, 2017

      Now that you know how simple it is to make, go ahead and dig into those recipes!

  7. avatar
    February 14, 2017

    I’ve never heard of rose water either, but I totally get when you go to make a recipe and are missing something, and going to WkikiHow for ideas on how to do it yourself! I have done that countless times too lol. LOVE the color of your rose water. I bet the smell is amazing.

    • avatar
      February 16, 2017

      It really is lovely smelling. Light and fresh. The internet is an amazing tool 🙂

  8. avatar
    Jennifer says:
    February 17, 2017

    How long of a shelf life do you estimate this has?

    • avatar
      February 18, 2017

      Hi Jennifer! Freshly made this should be stored in the refrigerator and used within a week. If you add the vodka it will last longer, but I’m not sure how much longer. Still in testing 😉

  9. avatar
    Kim says:
    February 18, 2017

    So cool! I’ve never thought about doing this!

  10. avatar
    kirsty says:
    February 19, 2017

    I found this just in time to use up my rose from valentines! Thank you! 🙂

  11. avatar
    Erin says:
    February 27, 2017

    Do you have to use pink/red flowers? Hubby just bought me some yellow roses!

  12. avatar
    Barbara Emma says:
    March 3, 2017

    if I made this and put it in a spray bottle wouldn’t help with my psoriasis?

    • avatar
      Barbara Emma says:
      March 3, 2017

      I met would it help with psoriasis

    • avatar
      March 19, 2017

      Hi Barbara. I know rose water is good for maintaining the ph level of skin, but I’m not sure how helpful it will be for you. I think it would be worth a try!

  13. avatar
    Rocio says:
    March 4, 2017

    I do something wrong! the liquid turn into something like blue 😮
    Do you have any idea what could i miss?

    • avatar
      March 6, 2017

      Hmmm, what color were your rose petals to begin with? The color comes directly from the petals, so the only thing I can think of is maybe the roses were spayed with something.

  14. avatar
    Kim says:
    March 18, 2017

    Oh THANK YOU for this recipe. I have many recipes n things that call for rose water, which I have had a hard time finding. Now I can make my own!!

  15. avatar
    Byanka says:
    June 10, 2017

    So when I made rose water I always did it with regular drinking water and seems to help but does the type of water make a difference with it the outcome. Also I never rinsed my rose pedals before putting them in water to boil because I thought the heat of the water will kill anything thing bad . Am I wrong for that?

    • avatar
      June 11, 2017

      Hello Byanka! You will get the same results with drinking water (out of the facet). Distilled is preferred because there may be bacteria in tap water that isn’t good for florals. You could boil the tap water before using it. I rise the flower petals like I do my vegetables. The water will rinse off any pollen or light residue. You need to boil the water to kill bacteria. Hope this helps.

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